How do you make a dry ice cocktail and is it safe?

21st December 2017

Have you ever heard of a dry ice cocktail? If you haven’t, you’re about to be blown away. If you have, you’re about to see the coolest dry ice cocktail ever made.

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Before we talk about our sensational dry ice cocktail, we’re going to explain what dry ice is, how it is used, and things you should never do with dry ice!

What’s dry ice?

dry ice cocktail

Dry ice is the common name for solid carbon dioxide (CO2). It gets its name because it does not melt into a liquid when heated; instead, it immediately becomes a gas. The scientific term for this is sublimation!

What’s it used for?

Dry ice begins to sublime at a bone-trembling -78 degrees therefore it’s used as a cooling agent. Here are some of the common uses of dry ice:

  • To create special effects such as smoke and fog
  • To clean industrial equipment
  • To flash freeze food to ensure freshness
  • To freeze pipes when they are being repaired

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What should you never do with dry ice?

It’s very low temperature is what can make dry ice dangerous; however, when handled correctly, it is perfectly safe. These are the things you should never do with dry ice:

  • Never place dry ice in the mouth or ingest it
  • Never let dry ice touch your skin as it can cause severe burns
  • Never handle or store dry ice in enclosed areas
  • Never serve a drink that contains dry ice without warning your customer

Why and when should you make a dry ice cocktail?  

Remember to always make dry ice cocktails in the presence of a trained professional.

Dry ice cocktails are always welcome at parties. Whip up a batch of punch and drop in some dry ice to create an incredible party centrepiece. Halloween is the perfect opportunity to use it as it makes your drinks look like smoking cauldrons!

If you’re a bartender and have worked with dry ice in the past, you know that it’s capable of creating the ultimate wow factor and will constantly leave your customers speechless.

Amazed by dry ice? You’ll be fascinated by the secret behind clear ice!

How do you make a Kentucky Coffee?

Our dry ice cocktail was crafted by Jonathan Van Drop, the head instructor at EBS Amsterdam. The guys over at EBS Amsterdam are renowned for their mixology skills and were acknowledged for them at the 2017 EBS Convention when they won the “School of the Year” award!

Anyway, back to the Kentucky Coffee, Jonathan told us the reason why he used a French press in this cocktail:

“Firstly, dry ice should never be directly consumed. Secondly, the French press allows for the dry ice to evaporate and pour a beautiful aroma of lemon and sage over the cocktails.”

Now you know everything about dry ice; here’s the list of ingredients and steps you need to take to craft our dry ice cocktail, the Kentucky Coffee.

Ingredients

40 ml Woodford Reserve

– 20 ml Amaro Montenegro

– 10 ml Maple syrup

– 30 ml Cold brew coffee

Method

  1. Carve a block of ice into a ball
  2. Add 40 ml of Woodford Reserve whiskey
  3. Next, add 30 ml of cold brew coffee
  4. Now, add 10 ml of maple syrup
  5. Finally, add 20 ml of Amaro Montenegro
  6. Pop in some ice and stir everything together
  7. Cut two pieces of lemon peel
  8. Put them into a French press with two leaves of sage
  9. Strain the mixture into the French press
  10. Drop in a piece of dry ice and let the vapour flow over the glasses
  11. Pour the liquid over the ice ball and serve with a sage leaf

Now, stand back and appreciate your magical dry ice cocktail!

dry ice cocktails

Are dangerously cool cocktails your thing? You’ll love the Blue Blazer!

Disclaimer: Do not attempt to make dry ice cocktails unless you are accompanied by a trained professional.

pedro

pedro

Peter is a Senior Copywriter at EBS. Born and raised in Liverpool, England, he has lived throughout Spain but now calls Barcelona his home from home. Peter is very fond of tea and rum (never mixed together though).